News roundup – Oct. 2-9, 2011

Some very interesting education-related news this week:

There were also some great blog posts/news articles about how the late Steve Jobs created technology that has really benefited children with disabilities, particularly the iPad.  This one, by Tim Carmody in Wired, is the best. 

Finally, hot off the presses, Governor Brown came through and signed SB 946 (Steinberg), which introduces a limited mandate for health insurers to pay for autism treatment — at least until the Federal health care bill is fully implemented in 2014. This is great for families who have been struggling to pay for autism treatment, or fighting with their insurance companies because autism treatment should already have been covered by California health insurance policies under AB 88, the state’s mental health parity law. It’s a big step forward and should provide the state budget with some relief, because schools and regional centers will no longer be the payers of last resort for autism treatment.

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One response to “News roundup – Oct. 2-9, 2011

  1. “It’s the old business of if you want your test scores to go up, don’t test the lower-scoring students,” said Doug McRae”

    “As a result, some districts have posted gains on the regular STAR test that really don’t exist.”

    This is what I’ve been saying for years… will school administrators start to listen now?

    SFUSD releases its press releases about the STAR test results:

    http://www.sfusd.edu/en/news/current-news/2011/08/sf-student-achievement-continues-to-grow.html

    and boasts that the district is “closing the achievement gap”… but it is simply NOT TRUE — all they are doing is not including the lower-scoring students in their percentages. Fuzzy Math. The number of African American students taking the CMA instead of the star test has gone roughly from 1.98% to almost 12% since 2008 … the “gap” isn’t closing, IT IS GETTING WIDER AND WIDER.

    If SFUSD cannot even be honest about the situation, how can they ever hope to make things better?